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Lunchbox Dad Creates Amazing Pop Culture-Themed Lunches for His Two Kids Every Week
Justin Page, laughingsquid.com
San Francisco-based father and blogger Beau Coffron (a.k.a. “Lunchbox Dad“) creates amazing, and also healthy, pop culture-themed lunches for his son and daughter every week. You can view more of his custom lunchbox creations, which all come with…

Fun lunchbox inspirations. Healthy never looked so good! #lunchbox #parents

Lunchbox Dad Creates Amazing Pop Culture-Themed Lunches for His Two Kids Every Week
Justin Page, laughingsquid.com

San Francisco-based father and blogger Beau Coffron (a.k.a. “Lunchbox Dad“) creates amazing, and also healthy, pop culture-themed lunches for his son and daughter every week. You can view more of his custom lunchbox creations, which all come with…

Fun lunchbox inspirations. Healthy never looked so good! #lunchbox #parents

Play is our brain’s favorite way of learning.

Diane Ackerman
Contemporary American author


A Negative Space Exercise noreply@blogger.com (Kathy Barbro), artprojectsforkids.org
I wanted to mix things up for my students this week, so I had them focus on the background of their art, or the negative space, instead of the positive. In honor of Sponge Bob, I declared it “Opposite Day”.1. Students lightly traced a…

Great PLAY @ Home activity! Easy to do with found objects at home allowing children to explore their creativity through negative space. Have fun experimenting with colors and patterns! Show us your creations by tagging the pictures with #CMTucson.

A Negative Space Exercise
noreply@blogger.com (Kathy Barbro), artprojectsforkids.org

I wanted to mix things up for my students this week, so I had them focus on the background of their art, or the negative space, instead of the positive. In honor of Sponge Bob, I declared it “Opposite Day”.
1. Students lightly traced a…

Great PLAY @ Home activity! Easy to do with found objects at home allowing children to explore their creativity through negative space. Have fun experimenting with colors and patterns! Show us your creations by tagging the pictures with #CMTucson.

Children’s Museum Tucson would like to share a little HAPPINESS & PLAY with you!

parentsmagazine:

10 Healthy After-School Snacks

Some great options! Enjoy!
explore-blog:

Adorable and moving photos of children from around the world with their favorite toys by Gabriele Galimberti, revealing how profoundly cultural influence shapes a child’s preferences. (Note, especially, the Ukrainian boy and his guns.)

explore-blog:

Adorable and moving photos of children from around the world with their favorite toys by Gabriele Galimberti, revealing how profoundly cultural influence shapes a child’s preferences. (Note, especially, the Ukrainian boy and his guns.)

3-D Imaging

Seeing in 3D

Three dimensional (3D) images are made of two photos of the same scene taken from a slightly different angle. The 3D images in this activity were made by coloring one view blue and one view red, and then printing the two photos on top of each other. When you wear the red/blue 3D glasses, the colored filters restrict your vision. One eye sees only the red photo and the other sees only the blue photo. Your brain merges these two separate images together into a single image with depth. 

Information provided by 

NISE Network

To learn more visit  

whatisnano.org

pbsparents:

Transform ordinary pom-poms into adorable little pets with this fun and easy craft! 

4 Tips for engaging kids with S.T.E.M.

Children tend to be curious and love to ask questions. It’s the investigator in them. They are able to explore the world around them and make good connections. While some like to observe and sketch out ideas others may build models and break them down in order to learn how they work. Both ways of learning allow children to experiment and try new things. They are learning naturally. These are the naturally qualities needed when exploring the elements of S.T.E.M.

4 Tips for engaging kids with S.T.E.M. 

  1. Start a conversation with your child about the ways that S.T.E.M. impacts their daily lives now and how it can be incorporated into their lives as a career option.
  2. Teach your child about S.T.E.M. Many of us are not experts in the field, but we can easily find community resources or events that will not only teach our children but we might learn a thing or two as well. Local Children’s Museums, Science Centers and Universities are great sources that tend to have S.T.E.M related exhibits and activities.
  3. Encourage your child to ask questions and help him or her to research the answers. It might be an hour on the computer, in the library or even testing an idea at home. 
  4. Make S.T.E.M. happen at home! Pinterest is a great site to find activities that are easy but fun.

Did you know?

The Children’s Museum Tucson offers children the ability to learn the fundamentals of STEM by playing and exploring with the hands-on exhibits in Investigation Station and by participating in our weekly Roll-Out-Science programming. Roll Out Science is an exclusive program created by Children’s Museum Tucson that creates an opportunity for children to form a hypothesis and experiment in order to come up with a scientific conclusion based on what they have investigated. Throughout February, Museum staff will also be showcasing new Nano Science activities. These are courtesy of the NISE Network, a national community of researchers and informal science educators dedicated to fostering public awareness, engagement and understanding of nanoscale science, engineering and technology.

Visit the Museum this month as we continue our month long celebration of S.T.E.M.! Click here to see what activities we have going on.

sesamestreet:

Need some last minute Valentines? How about these printables? Get them, and more, here: http://bit.ly/1opPX3n

Last minute Valentine templates!

sesamestreet:

Need some last minute Valentines? How about these printables? 

Get them, and more, here: http://bit.ly/1opPX3n

Last minute Valentine templates!